Science Department Philosophy and Goals

The Xaverian Science Department strives to promote within our students the development of sound scientific reasoning, tempered and enriched by the Christian ideals perpetuated by our entire school community. We believe that a mastery of the fundamental insights revealed by the scientific community, both past and present, is necessary for an adequate understanding and appreciation of our material universe. In addition, students are encouraged to develop an understanding of, and skills in, the process of science investigation.

Goals: 
  • To offer opportunities for students to use integrated process skills, thus assisting the students in developing intellectual processes of inquiry by which scientific problems and phenomena are explained, predicted and/or controlled. 
  • Develop students’ natural curiosity about the world around them, inspiring students to view the world through a scientific lens. 
  • Help students understand the importance of science and how the skills learned in science reasoning can help them in the real world by reinforcing critical thinking skills in and out of the classroom.

Science Department Middle School Courses

List of 3 items.

  • Science 6

    The 6th grade STEM Science class is based on the Design & Modeling course and the Automation &  Robotics course of Project Lead the Way’s middle school Gateway to Technology curriculum. This course provides students opportunities to apply the design process to creatively solve problems. Students learn and utilize methods for communicating design ideas through sketches, solid models, and mathematical models. Students will understand how models can be simulated to represent an authentic situation and generate data for further analysis and observations. Students work in teams to identify design requirements, research the topic, and engage stakeholders. Teams design a product, fabricate and test it, and make necessary modifications to optimize the design solution. Students trace the history, development, and influence of automation and robotics as they learn about mechanical systems, energy transfer, machine automation, and computer control systems. Students use the VEX Robotics® platform to design, build, and program real-world objects. Activities, projects, and problem-based learning scenarios progress from highly structured to student-centered. 
  • Science 7

    This course aims to introduce students to the world of coding while also focusing on the 7th-grade science curriculum. The course covers multiple different computer languages, allowing students to learn the skills necessary to create applications and games in block, python, and HTML (websites). Curriculum from Amazon’s future engineering program, microbit, and more make the course a fully rounded introduction to computer science. The class uses a project-based curriculum to supplement the seventh-grade science curriculum, allowing students to use microbits to create circuits and code websites that explain animal body systems.
  • Science 8

    The exciting world of aerospace comes alive through the Flight and Space (FS) unit. In the first semester, students become engineers as they design, prototype, and test models to learn about the science of flight and what it takes to travel and live in space. They solve real-world aviation and space challenges and plan a mission to Mars.

    In the second semester, students play the role of real-life medical detectives as they collect and analyze medical data to diagnose disease. They solve medical mysteries through hands-on projects and labs, measure and interpret vital signs, examine nervous system structure and function, and investigate disease outbreaks.

Science Department High School Courses

List of 15 items.

  • Living Environment

    This course follows the NYS curriculum in the study of living environment. Emphasis is given to Biochemistry, Cytology, Comparative Animal Anatomy and Physiology, Plant Morphology, Modern Genetics, Evolution, Ecology as well as the Scientific Method/Experimental Design. At the conclusion of this course, students will understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories pertaining to the living environment and recognize the historical development of ideas in science. Upon the completion of this course, the NYS Living Environment Regents exam is administered as a diploma requirement. This course includes a lab component where students will conduct hands-on experiments three times each cycle. The lab component is mandatory for completion of this course, as established by NYS Board of Regents.
  • Living Environment Honors

    This course follows the NYS curriculum in an in-depth study of living environment. Emphasis is given to Biochemistry, Cytology, Comparative Animal Anatomy and Physiology, Plant Morphology, Modern Genetics, Evolution, Ecology as well as the Scientific Method/Experimental Design. At the conclusion of this course, students will understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories pertaining to the living environment and recognize the historical development of ideas in science. Upon the completion of this course, the NYS Living Environment Regents exam is administered as a diploma requirement. This course includes a lab component where students will conduct hands-on experiments three times each cycle. The lab component is mandatory for the completion of this course, as established by NYS Board of Regents. In addition, there are enriched reading and writing assignments.
  • Earth Science

    This course is designed to introduce students to the study of Earth’s systems and its location in the universe. The concepts presented in this course will increase student knowledge of the physical world we live in and the processes going on around us. This course includes all Earth Science topics as required by the New York State learning standards for science. 
     
    Course topics can be divided into three major areas of study: 
    1. Geology: The study of the solid Earth. 
    2. Meteorology/Weather & Climate: A study of the changing conditions of the atmosphere over short and long periods of time. 
    3. Astronomy: The study of the motions of objects in space and Earth’s position in the universe.
  • Chemistry

    This course is an introductory chemistry course that provides the student with an excellent foundation for future courses of a related nature. The subject matter of the course is that of the New York State Regents Syllabus and includes atomic structure, bonding, acid-base theory, radioactivity, quantum chemistry, inorganic and organic chemistry. Principles, laws, and concepts are studied and experimentation and problem-solving are used to verify them. At the conclusion of this course, students will understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories pertaining to the physical setting of chemistry and recognize the historical development of ideas in science. In consultation with the classroom teacher, select students will be invited to take the Regents Exam in June based upon overall class performance.

    Prerequisite: A qualifying grade on the Living Environment Regents Exam and in the Integrated Algebra course is required.
  • Chemistry Honors

    This course is an introductory chemistry course that provides the student with an excellent foundation for future courses of a related nature. The subject matter of the course is that of the New York State Regents Syllabus and includes atomic structure, bonding, acid-base theory, radioactivity, quantum chemistry, inorganic and organic chemistry. Principles, laws, and concepts are studied and experimentation and problem-solving are used to verify them. At the conclusion of this course, students will understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories pertaining to the physical setting of chemistry and recognize the historical development of ideas in science. 

     Prerequisite: 
    • 85% or higher on the Living Environment Regents and a 90% average in the course.
  • Physical Science

    The chemistry portion of this course will be one half of a semester and the physics portion the other half. Students will explore many different topics pertaining to physics and chemistry including effects of forces, transformations of energy, structure of matter, behavior of matter, and the properties pertaining to the changes in matter. This course will also have a laboratory component where students will examine the concepts taught in class. There is no regents exam for this course.
  • Physics

    The New York State Regents requires the study of the following topics: kinematics, mechanics, optics, light, electricity, magnetism, and modern physics. The objectives of this course extend to an appreciation of the methods of science, the habit of critical thinking, and the ability to carefully examine experimental evidence. At the conclusion of this course, students will understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories pertaining to the physical setting of physics and recognize the historical development of ideas in science. The required NYS lab component is included in this curriculum. In consultation with the classroom teacher, select students will be invited to take the Regents Exam in June based upon overall class performance.

    Prerequisite: 
    • Completion of Chemistry
  • Physics Honors

    The following topics will be covered in this physics course: kinematics, mechanics, optics, light, electricity, magnetism, and modern physics. The objectives of this course extend to an appreciation of the methods of science, the habit of critical thinking, and the ability to carefully examine experimental evidence. At the conclusion of this course, students will understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories pertaining to the physical setting of physics and recognize the historical development of ideas in science. The required NYS lab component is included in this curriculum.

    Prerequisite:
    • 85% average in Chemistry and in Math.
    • Qualifying regents score
  • AP Physics I

    This one year course focuses on the NYS Regents curriculum, which will be covered at an advanced level, and also the College Board Advanced Placement curriculum. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be eligible to enroll in the Advanced Placement Physics II course in their senior year. Students will explore principles of Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits. During the course, a strong emphasis is placed on lab work which will allow students to develop experimental and investigative skills. Students will also develop a sense of the limitations of the experimental sciences.

    Prerequisite: This course is open to full Honors Program students who:
    • earn a grade of 90% or better in Chemistry 10H or AP Chemistry
    • 85% on the Geometry Regents exam
    • Students enrolled in Chemistry need approval from their Chemistry teacher
  • AP Chemistry 12

    This is a one year course designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first college year. Students are expected to attain a depth of understanding of fundamentals and a reasonable competence in dealing with chemical problems. The major topics fall into the categories of structures of matter, states of matter, reactions, descriptive chemistry, and laboratory procedures.  Students must participate in a laboratory program involving experimental observations and data analysis. The requirements for this course are 85% in chemistry, passing the chemistry regent exam, and 85% in the student’s current math course.
     
    Prerequisites: 
    • 85% average in Chemistry 9/10 (H) course as well as 85% on Chemistry Regents Exam
    • Students enrolled in this course must already have completed a year of Chemistry
    • The College Board charges testing fees for all AP exams. These fees will be added to Xaverian tuition bills.
    • This is an approved elective course for students in any of the Honors Programs.
  • AP Physics II

    This college-level elective is open to seniors in the Honors Program. The main objective of the course is to introduce students to the key principles of Physics in the topics of fluids, thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, optics, and topics in modern physics. The emphasis is on the development of conceptual understanding and problem-solving ability using algebra and trigonometry. This is a one year course including a laboratory component. It provides a foundation in physics for students in the life sciences, pre-medicine, and various applied sciences, as well as other fields not directly related to science.

    Prerequisite: Completion of the Advanced Placement Physics I course and approval from the course instructor.
  • St. John's University Human Biology / Anatomy and Physiology Honors

    This is a college-elective 3 credit course geared toward the student who hopes to pursue a career in the biological sciences. The topics include an in-depth study of human body systems, concluding with the molecular and clinical mechanisms of HIV and AIDS. Laboratory activities include a detailed study of tissues, the mammalian heart, skull and skeletal models, and organ systems of the albino rat and domestic cat. Students are required to present current research on medical advances using PowerPoint in a seminar forum. Adhering to the lab schedule and textbook assignment deadlines is essential for success in this rigorous course.

    St. John’s University College Advantage Program*
    Prerequisites:
    • A minimum of 85% and 80% in the Living Environment and Chemistry courses respectively, with passing grades on both Regents exams.
    • Enrollment in this course requires the approval of the Assistant Principal for Academics, the Science Department Chairperson, or the current Anatomy and Physiology instructor.
    • A minimum combined Math and Verbal SAT score of 1080
    • This is an approved elective course for students in any of the Honors Programs.
    • This course is open to seniors only for St. John’s credit
    • In addition to the lecture periods, lab periods will also be held within the 9-day cycle
    *Students successfully passing this course will be eligible to receive up to 3 college credits through St. John’s University. Students will be responsible for all additional fees charged by St. John’s as well as completing any required applications for acceptance to the College Advantage Program.
  • AP Biology

    This college-level elective is open to qualifying Honors or Academy seniors who have successfully completed the Living Environment and Chemistry courses. The three main objectives of the course are to help students develop (1) a conceptual framework for modern biology, (2) analytical skills to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology, and (3) an appreciation of science as a process. The ongoing knowledge explosion in biology makes these objectives even more challenging.

    The AP Biology Exam, taken in May, seeks to be representative of the topics covered by the syllabus. Accordingly, goals have been set for percentage coverage of three general areas:

    I. Molecules and Cells, 25%
    II. Heredity and Evolution, 25%
    III. Organisms and Populations, 50%
     
    Prerequisites:
    • Minimal final grade of 85% in Living Environment and Chemistry
    • Minimal grade of 85% on the Living Environment Regents exam
    • Passing grade on the Chemistry Regents exam
    • Approval by the course instructor
  • Marine Biology

    The Marine Science course is offered as an elective to senior students.  Emphasis is given to marine geology, plate tectonics, classification of marine organisms, characteristics and adaptations, physical and chemical properties of seawater, factors that affect waves, tides, and currents, principles of marine ecology, and human interaction on the marine environment. 
      • Throughout the year students will delve into these topics with a particular focus being given to our immediate surrounding body of water here in the Narrows and as they apply to the mid-Atlantic and our global oceans.  
      • Students will also apply the principles of living environment and chemistry to the marine setting.  In doing so, students will be classifying marine organisms according to phylogenetic groups.  
      • They’ll be examining the ecology of the marine ecosystem, and students will be able to explain which specific characteristics allow these organize to survive in even some of the most extreme environmental conditions. 
      • Students will develop a complete understanding of marine and freshwater food webs; from energy producing green algae to top predatory fish and mammals like sharks and whales.  
    In addition to digital media resources from the Oceanography iBook, students will partake in various hands on activities identifying major structures on various bony finned fishes.  Students will examine internal anatomy of fishes, mollusks and aquatic invertebrates through dissection labs.  These hands on experiments will be implemented within the course as well as offsite including field trips to local beaches, estuaries and aquariums.  The course will include a specific midterm and final exam upon completion.  
  • Bioethics

    This course will explore fundamental ethical issues that arise in medicine, health, and biotechnology through critical thinking, writing, and discussion. Some topics that will be explored are reproductive technology, euthanasia, vaccinations, organ donation, and cloning to name a few. Students will investigate the science that makes these procedures possible and then debate whether the practice is ethical. Arguments will be examined through different lenses based on religion and culture. In this course, students will also enhance their science literacy through research and present their findings in various manners.

Science Department Specialized Studies Courses

List of 6 items.

  • Living Environment

    This course has a strong emphasis on four major topics: Ecology and Evolution, Genetics and Mutation, Cellular Respiration, and Homeostasis. Emphasis will also be given in the following topics to prepare students for the NYS Regents: Cytology, Biochemistry, and Scientific-Method of Design. All students will be expected to complete lab experiments, helping them develop laboratory skills while also helping them improve reading and writing skills in the content area.
  • Life Science

    Students taking this course will be prepared for the Living Environment Regents at the end of their sophomore year. At the conclusion of this course, students will understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories pertaining to the living environment and recognize the historical development of ideas in science.
  • Chemistry

    This course is an introductory chemistry course that provides the student with an excellent foundation for future courses of a related nature. The subject matter of the course is that of the New York State Regents Syllabus and includes atomic structure, bonding, acid-base theory, radioactivity, quantum chemistry, inorganic and organic chemistry. Principles, laws, and concepts are studied and experimentation and problem-solving are used to verify them. At the conclusion of this course, students will understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories pertaining to the physical setting of chemistry and recognize the historical development of ideas in science.
  • Physics

    This course will include information in compliance with the New York Performance Standards (GPS)/ Common Core. Students will analyze the relationships between force, mass, gravity, and the motion of objects. Students will evaluate the significance of energy in understanding the structure of matter and the universe. Students will evaluate the forms and transformations of energy, analyze the properties and applications of waves,  and evaluate relationships between electrical and magnetic forces. Students will be able to describe the corrections to Newtonian physics given by quantum mechanics and relativity when matter is very small, moving fast compared to the speed of light, or very large.
  • Introduction to Human Physiology

    Anatomy and Physiology is a course that will enable students to develop an understanding of the relationships between the structures and functions of the human body. Students will also learn the mechanisms for maintaining homeostasis within the human body. Specific focus will also be given to each system of the human body. This course will involve laboratory activities, projects, dissections, models, diagrams, and case studies. 
  • Forensic Science

    This is an interdisciplinary study of science and law. Students will examine investigative techniques and scientific methodology in determining evidentiary clues. Topics to be covered include impression evidence (footwear and tire tracks), firearm and tool marks, explosives, trace evidence (hairs, fibers, glass, and chemical microscopy). Demonstrations and hands-on participation offer unique opportunities.

Science Department Members

List of 16 members.

  • Photo of Robert Procida

    Robert Procida 02

    Science Department Chairperson
    (718) 836-7100 x861
  • Photo of Kathleen Campbell

    Kathleen Campbell 

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x801
  • Photo of Victor Coradin

    Victor Coradin 

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x811
  • Photo of Gregory Delgeorge

    Gregory Delgeorge 

    Coordinator of Engineering
    (718) 836-7100 x813
  • Photo of Artesia Dorsey

    Artesia Dorsey 

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x797
  • Photo of Frank Elie

    Frank Elie 12

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x792
  • Photo of Dean Etri

    Dean Etri 

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x823
  • Photo of Roseann Guido

    Roseann Guido 

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x821
  • Photo of Lalita Krishnamurthy

    Lalita Krishnamurthy 

    Coordinator of Biomedical Sciences
    (718) 836-7100 x859
  • Photo of Elisavet Loukaidou

    Elisavet Loukaidou 

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x871
  • Photo of Daniel Mace

    Daniel Mace 

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x842
  • Photo of Daniel Majikas

    Daniel Majikas 

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x800
  • Photo of Erin Richroath

    Erin Richroath 

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x804
  • Photo of James Schreiner

    James Schreiner 04

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x188
  • Photo of Christian Stellato

    Christian Stellato 10

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x864
  • Photo of Timothy Vourderis

    Timothy Vourderis 12

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x891
Established in 1957, Xaverian is one of thirteen schools nationwide sponsored by the Xaverian Brothers.
Xaverian
7100 Shore Road         Brooklyn, New York 11209         Phone: (718) 836-7100