Social Studies Department Philosophy and Goals

The purpose of Social Studies instruction at Xaverian is to promote the ability of our students to make informed and reasoned decisions for the welfare of society consistent with Gospel values as members of a culturally diverse, democratic society in an interdependent world.
 
Goals:
 
  • To develop critical thinking skills, competency in problem-solving, interpreting data, and distinguishing between fact and opinion;
  • To provide the historical foundation essential for an understanding of the political, social, cultural, economic, and geographical forces shaping the modern world;
  • To develop the following skills: study methods, critical thinking, oral and written communication, and research methodology;
  • To promote an appreciation of the dignity of all individuals and a committed concern for their welfare.

Social Studies Department Middle School Courses

List of 3 items.

  • Social Studies 6

    This course examines some of the important cultures throughout World History. Beginning with prehistoric times and the dawn of civilization, students will explore major social, political, and cultural themes. By examining secondary and primary sources, students will sharpen their critical thinking and writing skills. 
  • Social Studies 7

    Students will explore American history from the period of Reconstruction to modern times. Through the analysis of primary source materials, including political documents, newspaper articles and cartoons, speeches, and photographs, students will come to better understand the major political, economic, social, and militaristic themes which run through American History.  In the course of the year, students will continue to sharpen their analytical, critical thinking and reading skills, and their writing, in order to better prepare for high school.
  • Social Studies 8

    This course will explore the eras and themes of United States history from 1870 to the present day. It will integrate current events in an effort to draw parallels among historical events and periods and will attempt to build arguments using historical background.

Social Studies Department High School Courses

List of 16 items.

  • Global Studies 9

    The objective of this course is to present to the student an overview of Global History from primitive times to the Age of Absolutism and to enhance the skills necessary to excel in the New York State Global Studies Regents exam. Consistent with New York State Social Studies Regents’ testing, this class will include document analysis and the completion of analytical essays.
  • Global Studies 9H

    The objective of this course is to present to the student an overview of Global History from primitive times to the Age of Absolutism and to enhance the skills necessary to excel in both the New York State Global Studies Regents and the Advanced Placement World History exam. Consistent with the AP World History exam, this class necessitates a more advanced textbook, the reading of complex documents, and the completion of challenging essays. 
  • Global Studies 10

    The objective of this course is to prepare students for the Global Studies Regents exam administered at the end of the sophomore year. The Global 10 curriculum will present an overview of global events from the Enlightenment to the present day. As in Global 9, students will be required to evaluate relevant documents and complete Regents’ style essay questions.
  • Global Studies 10H

    The content objectives of this course are identical to those of the Global Studies 10 course with the addition of enrichment reading and writing assignments. The reading assignments will include the interpretation of extensive primary source material.  Students are accepted based upon academic achievement in the freshman year Global Studies course and departmental approval. As an honors class, students will be required to read additional and more challenging material. An added requirement of this class is that students will read one historical work (non-fiction or fiction) during the school year.
  • AP World History

    The purpose of the AP World History course is to develop a greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts, in interaction with different types of human societies. This course highlights the nature of changes in international frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies. It will also emphasize relevant factual knowledge used in conjunction with leading interpretive issues and types of historical evidence. The course will also build upon an understanding of cultural, institutional, and technological precedents that, along with geography, set the human stage.  An added requirement of this class is that students will read one historical work of non-fiction. Students in this class will take the World History Advanced Placement exam as well as the Global Studies Regents exam.
  • United States History

    This course is taken after completion of Global Studies 10. The course objective is to introduce the student to a well-organized presentation of the experiences and accomplishments of the American people and to provide the basis for an objective and critical evaluation of the growth and development of the United States from colonial time to the present. This course will emphasize the integration and use of primary source documents. Students take the Regents exam in United States History and Government upon the completion of this course. The junior history research paper is a course requirement.
  • United States History Honors

    This course is taken after completion of Global Studies 10(H). The course objective is to introduce the student to a well-organized presentation of the experiences and accomplishments of the American people and to provide the basis for an objective and critical evaluation of the growth and development of the United States from colonial time to the present. This course will emphasize the integration and use of primary source documents. Students take the Regents exam in United States History and Government upon the completion of this course. The junior history research paper is a course requirement.
  • AP United States History

    The Advanced Placement Program (AP) offers a course and exam in AP United States History to qualified students who wish to complete studies in secondary school equivalent to an introductory college course in U.S. history. The AP U.S. History course is designed to provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. history. The program will prepare students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students in this class will be required to complete a junior research paper commensurate with a Xaverian honors-level Social Studies class.
  • American Government and Economics

    This course will discuss the basic principles of American Government and Law with an emphasis upon citizen participation. The course will also present the basic principles of criminal law, consumer law, family law, housing law, and individual rights in our democratic society. Included in this course is an overview of economics which will present basic understanding of macroeconomics and microeconomics. Topics will include money and banking, financial institutions, the role of government, and current national and international economic problems.
  • St. John's University American National Government

    This course will discuss the nature of United States federalism, the structure and work of the national government, the executive branch, the Congress and executive-legislative relationship, and the federal judiciary with reference to appropriate constitutional cases.
  • Advanced Placement European History

    This course is designed to help the student become familiar with European history from 1450 to the present. Elements of that history which will be explored include, but are not limited to, intellectual and cultural components, political and diplomatic factors, as well as, social and economic aspects. 
     
    The course will also seek to familiarize the student with major historical themes of European history. Additionally, the course will require students to analyze historical evidence and historical interpretations, with a major part of the course dedicated to the student’s development in expressing historical knowledge by means of writing. 
     
    The course will cover topics in the following areas:
    - Renaissance and Exploration
    - Age of Reformation
    - Absolutism and Constitutionalism
    - Scientific, Philosophical, and Political Developments 
    - Conflict, Crisis and Reaction in the Late 18th Century
    - Industrialization and its Effects
    - 19th Century Perspectives and Political Developments
    - 20th Century Global Conflicts
    - Cold War and Contemporary Europe
  • Foundations of Law and Political Science

    This class is the introductory level class for Honors students who are entering Xaverian’s AP Law & Political Science Honors Program.  Academy students with proven success in Social Studies & English as well as an interest in law may apply for this class through the Honors office. This class will discuss fundamental concepts of the American legal system which would include the structure of the American court system, the role of lawyers in our legal system, basic concepts of criminal law, juvenile justice, tort law, consumer law, family law, environmental law, legal ethics, and core concepts of Constitutional law. After successfully completing this class, students will be allowed to continue in Xaverian’s law program and enroll in St. John’s American Government and Constitutional Law as well as other electives in this sequence.
  • Criminal Law

    In this second-year course of Xaverian’s Law Program, students will examine in detail the nature and causes of crime, study the legal requirements of major crimes, the impact of crime upon its victims, crimes of omission, computer crime, substance abuse crime, and the criminal justice system. Students will discuss controversial issues that involve our criminal justice system. A key focus of the course will involve the application of legal concepts to case study situations.
  • Advanced Constitutional Law

    This course is designed to enable students to think as informed citizens in reference to the most significant and enduring issues of the United States Constitution. It will focus on noteworthy cases of American Constitutional Law with a spotlight on civil liberties, criminal law, and first amendment rights. Students taking this class will be required to read and examine excerpts from Supreme Court decisions.
  • Introduction to Psychology

    This introductory course surveys the basic principles within the major perspectives in Psychology including physiological psychology, learning, cognition, memory, development, personality, and social psychology. There are four major objectives of the course requiring students:
    • To understand the historical development of the perspective, its assumptions, research methodology, and the strengths and weaknesses of the perspective
    • To access, critically read, and evaluate articles taken from Journals of Psychology and relevant scientific literature that lend themselves to a psychological study
    • To develop skills of analytical/expository writing within the discipline
    • To expose students to the transdisciplinary nature of psychology by connecting their learning to literature, music, art, business, and other subjects they are exposed to
  • Syracuse University Psychology

    The Syracuse University Psychology course is an advanced college-level course completed by junior and senior students in the Honors Program at Xaverian. The course aims to form the intellect, personality, and character of students. The academic goal of the course is to encourage an in-depth understanding of the perspectives, principles, and research findings within major schools of psychology including neuropsychology, learning, and memory, cognition and problem solving, development, abnormal psychology, and social psychology. 

    Course Objectives:
    • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the theoretical perspectives, quantitative and qualitative research, and critical issues in psychology.
    • Students will learn to access, critically read and evaluate journal articles.
    • Students will learn to conduct and present psychological research using technology and statistical applications.
    • Students will analyze psychological issues from a multicultural perspective. This objective will be met through formal instruction in class and informal discussions during Psychology Club: an extension of classroom learning which fosters an opportunity for critical thinking and peer sharing.
    • Highly motivated students will be encouraged to engage in the completion of the Advanced Placement Psychology Exam

Social Studies Department Specialized Studies Courses

List of 4 items.

  • Global Studies 9

    The objective of this course is to present to the student an overview of global history from primitive times to the Age of Absolutism and to begin preparing for the NYS Global Regents examination in sophomore year. Special emphasis is given to global uniformities and local distinctions. Consistent with NYS Standards, the course will require students to examine key documents in world history.
  • Global Studies 10

    The course will analyze events and people from the Enlightenment to the present day along with a brief review of topics in Global 9. Students will be taught to think historically, culturally, and politically about the historical evolution of states and societies. They will examine the impact that geography, resources, religion, and culture had on that growth and what factors unite and what factors divide peoples around the world and across time.
  • United States History 11

    The students are introduced to a well-organized presentation of the experiences, accomplishments, and failures of the American people and are given the basis for an objective and critical evaluation of the United States from Colonial Times to the present. The ideas and institutions established by the American people and the influence they have attained over time are addressed. Students follow NYS Standards and take the NYS Regents in June.
  • Government/Ethics and Economics 12

    The first half of this course focuses on such topics as civics, citizenship, and government. Students will study contemporary and/or historic public issues to increase awareness of their rights and responsibilities as citizens. The term participation is interpreted in its broad sense. It is designed to engage students in the analysis of public policies and issues that are relevant to the individual student. A portion of the course will be devoted to crime in America and the Juvenile Justice System. The second half of the course is designed to give students an understanding of basic economic concepts. Students become familiar with the economic system of the United States and how it operates. They also explore the roles of various components of the American economic system. Students examine their roles as consumers, workers, investors, and voting citizens. Topics of discussion include the Stock Market, comparative economic systems, and the impact of political and social decisions on the economy.

Social Studies Department Members

List of 13 members.

  • Photo of Richard Montalbano

    Richard Montalbano 

    Social Studies Department Chairperson
    (718) 836-7100 x802
  • Photo of Michael Berardi

    Michael Berardi 

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x837
  • Photo of Jillian Bronshteyn

    Jillian Bronshteyn 

    School Counselor, Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x159
  • Photo of Jesus Cardona

    Jesus Cardona 07

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x817
  • Photo of Valerie Gilson

    Valerie Gilson 

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x188
  • Photo of Scott Goodfellow

    Scott Goodfellow 

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x807
  • Photo of Edma Jure

    Edma Jure 

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x881
  • Photo of Dionisie Kallo

    Dionisie Kallo 07

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x850
  • Photo of Vitaliy Kuzmin

    Vitaliy Kuzmin 07

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x899
  • Photo of John Maiocco

    John Maiocco 

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x880
  • Photo of Eileen Postler

    Eileen Postler 

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x852
  • Photo of Thomas Tellefsen

    Thomas Tellefsen 

    Equity Program Coordinator
    (718) 836-7100 x153
  • Photo of Joseph Verde

    Joseph Verde 

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x894
Established in 1957, Xaverian is one of thirteen schools nationwide sponsored by the Xaverian Brothers.
Xaverian
7100 Shore Road         Brooklyn, New York 11209         Phone: (718) 836-7100