English Department Philosophy and Goals

Xaverian’s English Department provides a student-centered learning environment of active thinkers, readers, writers, and speakers who immerse themselves in complex texts, synthesize information between and among texts, and make personal, faith-filled connections to the texts through an inquiry-driven, skills-based, technology-enriched curriculum. Through literature, writing assignments, and class discussions, students are introduced to the important issues and ideas that will help them to explore their own identity, while also making connections to other works of literature and the world around them.

Goals:
  • To advance communication skills through reading, thinking, analyzing, and writing.
  • To provide the basic tools for active reading so students can investigate the effects of literary techniques and rhetorical strategies in an array of challenging pieces that span from Greek mythology to 21st-century young adult novels.
  • To introduce academic vocabulary, nuances of grammar, and reading comprehension skills that are needed in the world today. 

English Department Middle School Courses

List of 5 items.

  • Writing 6

    This course will introduce students to the conventions of standard written English, the writing process as a whole, and different types of writing. This will occur through various activities designed to target these skills such as free-writing, formal written assignments, and on-demand, in-class writing. The course will operate in conjunction with the 6th-grade literature course and will use prompts and excerpts from literature books as a context to demonstrate writing skills. The course will be divided into units based on the type of writing being studied and will increase in complexity as the year progresses. Students will be expected to keep a portfolio of their writing for review at the end of each quarter.
  • Literature 6

    The goal of Literature 6 is to teach students how to read for critical analysis. The class will follow a workshop model where students will be exposed to various types of reading skills and strategies. Students will learn how to annotate a text to explore the deeper meaning behind an author’s use of literary devices and elements. After each lesson, students are expected to actively engage in a variety of different activities in a timely work period. These lessons can involve whole group reading, independent reading, critical thinking questions, accountable talk, and much more. In conjunction with Writing 6, this course will help students write creatively, critically, and analytically in response to literature. Consistent instruction in style and craft reinforces students’ ability to produce competent and structured essays that analyze, argue, synthesize, and compare/contrast.
  • Writing 7

    This course will introduce students to the conventions of standard written English, the writing process as a whole, and different types of writing. This will occur through various activities designed to target these skills such as free-writing, formal written assignments, and on-demand, in-class writing. The course will operate in conjunction with the 7th-grade literature course and will use prompts and excerpts from literature books as a context to demonstrate writing skills. The course will be divided into units based on the type of writing being studied and will increase in complexity as the year progresses. Students will be expected to keep a portfolio of their writing for review at the end of each quarter.
  • Literature 7

    The goal of Literature 7 is to build off the skills established in Literature 6 and to strengthen students’ abilities to analyze ideas, synthesize information, think critically, and communicate effectively. Using the summer reading, required course texts, and selected outside sources, students will discuss and analyze a variety of topics, including but not limited to facing personal challenges, social justice, the nature of morality, and the role of the individual in society. Students will hone their reading skills by annotating texts that span genres, formats, and reading levels. In conjunction with Writing 7, this course will help students write creatively, critically, and analytically in response to literature. Consistent instruction in style and craft, grammar and vocabulary reinforce students’ ability to produce competent and structured essays that analyze, argue, synthesize, and compare/contrast. 
  • English 8

    English 8 focuses both on developing reading and writing skills in preparation for high school. The goal of English 8 is to build off the skills established in Literature 7 and Writing 7 and to strengthen students’ abilities to analyze ideas, synthesize information, think critically, and communicate effectively. Students will be exposed to various types of reading skills and strategies. Using the summer reading, required course texts, and selected outside sources, students will discuss and analyze a variety of topics. Students will hone their reading skills by annotating texts that span genres, formats, and reading levels. This course will help students write creatively, critically, and analytically in response to literature. Consistent instruction in style and craft, grammar, and vocabulary reinforces students’ ability to produce competent and structured essays that analyze, argue, synthesize, and compare/contrast.

English Department High School Courses

List of 15 items.

  • English 9

    Course Theme: Human Values: Honor, Strength, Integrity, and Character 

    The focus of this course is on reading for critical analysis and writing for effective communication. Given the basic tools for active reading, students investigate the effects of literary techniques and rhetorical strategies in an array of works, such as William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin in the Sun, John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men, and a book of students’ choice. Furthermore, various complex informational texts serve as the basis for analyzing a writer's purpose and tone. Consistent instruction in style and craft reinforces the students’ ability to produce competent and structured essays that analyze, argue, synthesize, and compare/contrast. Likewise, all freshmen conduct the step-by-step process for completing a research paper in accordance with MLA style and format standards. With an emphasis on reading for context clues, the course introduces students to academic vocabulary words and Latin/Greek roots and prefixes. In preparation for the SAT and ACT, students are regularly assessed with standardized reading comprehension quizzes, and each month, students review and are assessed on a different grammar and writing topic that appears on these exams. In preparation for the ELA Common Core Regents exam in the junior year, students read closely and critically, producing text-based responses and analyses from a variety of sources. 
  • English 9H

    Course Theme: Human Values: Honor, Strength, Integrity, and Character 

    The curriculum for this reading and writing intensive course is an accelerated version of the English 9 program. Provided with the basic tools for active reading, students investigate the effects of literary techniques and rhetorical strategies in an array of challenging pieces, including William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin in the Sun, a number of works from Greek mythology, and a book of students’ choice. Furthermore, various complex informational texts serve as the basis for analyzing a writer's purpose and tone. Consistent instruction in style and craft reinforces the students’ ability to produce competent and structured essays that analyze, argue, synthesize, and compare/contrast. Likewise, all freshmen conduct the step-by-step process for completing a research paper in accordance with MLA style and format standards. With an emphasis on reading for context clues, the course introduces students to academic vocabulary words and Latin/Greek roots and prefixes. In preparation for the SAT and ACT, students are regularly assessed with standardized reading comprehension quizzes, and each month, students review and are assessed on a different grammar and writing topic that appears on these exams. In preparation for the ELA Common Core Regents exam in the junior year, students read closely and critically, producing text-based responses and analyses from a variety of sources. 
  • English 10

    Theme: The Individual in Conflict: Conscience, Cause, and Corruption

    With the focus remaining on critical reading and writing, this course helps students further explore the world of literary characters who face difficult personal, moral, spiritual, psychological, and religious choices, often perceived as “outsiders” as a result of their heroic feats or tragic flaws. Through works such as William Shakespeare’s Macbeth, Reginald Rose’s Twelve Angry Men, J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye, along with a book of a student’s choice and other supplementary nonfiction works, students read and analyze several pieces of literature and engage in writing for literary analysis and interpretation. Attention to a writer's craft, tone, and style complements the students’ ability to produce critical essays that interpret, evaluate, analyze, argue, and synthesize. In addition to text-appropriate vocabulary, students read for context clues and for the nuances of a writer's diction in both fiction and nonfiction. In preparation for the ELA Common Core Regents exam in the junior year, students read closely and critically and produce text-based arguments and analyses in addition to writing from a variety of perspectives. In preparation for the SAT and ACT, students are regularly assessed with standardized reading comprehension quizzes, and each month, students review and are assessed on a different grammar and writing topic that appears on these exams. 
  • English 10H

    Course Theme: The Individual in Conflict: Conscience, Cause, and Corruption

    In this accelerated version of the English 10 course, students further explore the world of literary characters who face difficult personal, moral, spiritual, psychological, and religious choices, often perceived as “outsiders” as a result of their heroic feats or tragic flaws. Through works such as William Shakespeare’s Macbeth, Reginald Rose’s Twelve Angry Men, J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye, along with a book of a student’s choice and other supplementary nonfiction works, students read and analyze several challenging pieces of literature and engage in writing for literary analysis and interpretation. Attention to a writer's craft, tone, and style complements the students’ ability to produce critical essays that interpret, evaluate, analyze, argue, and synthesize. In addition to text-appropriate vocabulary, students read for context clues and for the nuances of a writer's diction in both fiction and nonfiction. In preparation for the ELA Common Core Regents exam in the junior year, students read closely and critically and produce text-based arguments and analyses in addition to writing from a variety of perspectives. In preparation for the SAT and ACT, students are regularly assessed with standardized reading comprehension quizzes, and each month, students review and are assessed on a different grammar and writing topic that appears on these exams. 
     
    **Admission to this course is based on: 1) approval of the English Department, 2) an overall 93% average in English 9 or 90% in English 9(H), 3) the student’s conduct which is appropriate for an intensive reading and writing course, and 4) an evaluation of the student’s formal writings from freshman year.** 
  • English 11

    Course Theme: The Struggle and Search for Self-Identity

    This course teaches students to examine literary themes of morality and conscience, rebellion and revolt, perception and reality, and the individual in search of self-identity. All students read August Wilson's Fences, Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire, a book of their choice, and other works such as Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter and Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman, thereby reinforcing the skills of literary analysis and argumentation. In preparation for the January NYS ELA Common Core Regents, which all juniors must pass in order to graduate, students thoroughly review the components of the exam, focusing on active reading strategies and carefully outlined writing skills for effective analysis and synthesis writing. In addition to academic vocabulary, reading for context clues, and the study of Latin/Greek roots and prefixes, students learn how to determine the nuances of text-specific vocabulary. Critical reading and writing skills for the SAT and ACT become the focus from February to May. In addition, each month, students review and are assessed on a different grammar and writing topic that appears on these exams. In the spring, students begin the college application essay writing process. 
  • SJU Introduction to American Literature

    Course Theme: The Struggle and Search for Self-Identity

    This course offers an intensive study of a limited number of texts drawn from the various periods of American literature. All students read August Wilson's Fences and Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire, as well as other works by authors such as Nathaniel Hawthorne, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Kate Chopin, Alice Walker, and Arthur Miller, thereby reinforcing the skills of literary analysis and argumentation. Through these works, students examine the themes of morality and conscience, hopes and dreams, perception and reality, and the individual in search of self-identity. In preparation for the January NYS ELA Common Core Regents, which all juniors must pass in order to graduate, students thoroughly review the components of the exam: reading comprehension, textual analysis, and writing from sources. In addition to reviewing academic vocabulary, reading for context clues, and studying Latin/Greek roots and prefixes, students learn how to determine the nuances of text-specific vocabulary. Critical reading and writing skills for the SAT and ACT become the focus from February to May. In addition, each month, students review and are assessed on a different grammar and writing topic that appears on these exams. In the spring, students begin the college application essay writing process. 
     
    *Students who successfully pass this course will be eligible to receive 3 college credits through St. John’s University. Students will be responsible for all additional fees charged by St. John’s as well as completing any required applications for acceptance to the College Advantage Program. 
     
    Prerequisites:
    • This is an approved course for students in any of the Honors Programs.

    • Approval of the English Department 
    • An overall 90% in English 10(H) or an overall 93% in English 10
    • An overall average of 80%

    • A minimum combined Math and Verbal PSAT score of 1060 by the time of course selection
    • An evaluation of the student’s writing portfolio from sophomore English 
    • This course is open to juniors only for St. John’s credit 
  • AP English Language and Composition

    In preparation for the Advanced Placement English Language and Composition exam given in May, this course engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts and in becoming skilled writers and presenters who compose and prepare for a variety of purposes, including arguing, synthesizing, and analyzing. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purpose, audience expectations, and subjects, as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing. Each student maintains a writing portfolio of written and revised pieces. By analyzing complex texts, students also prepare for the critical reading and writing sections on the SAT and ACT.


    **Admission to this course is based on 1) approval of the English Department, 2) an overall 93% average in English 10 or 90% average in English 10(H), 3) a score of 24 or higher on the English sections of the preACT or a 600 (out of 800) or higher on the Reading section of the SAT, 4) the student’s conduct which is appropriate for an intensive reading and writing course, and 5) an evaluation of the student’s formal writings from sophomore year.** 
  • English 12: College Prep English

    Course Theme: Examining the "Self" and Exploring the "Other"

    The college reading and composition course focuses on broadening and enriching the students' perspectives through literary works and informational texts from a variety of points of view, philosophies, and disciplines. Students read, analyze, discuss, tweet, and write about informational texts, essays, plays, and fiction that explore the human experience. As a result, the students grow in awareness of the relationship between the craftsman and his craft. In addition, this course will reinforce previously taught writing skills that allow the students to produce persuasive, analytical, expository, technical, and creative pieces. Therefore, to meet the demands of the real world, students will be expected to communicate through formal presentations, speeches, and debates, as well as practice an array of modes, including writing an editorial, a proposal, and a cover letter and resume. As part of their graduation requirement, all seniors must complete a research position paper in accordance with MLA style and format standards. In preparation for college, students will refine their personal narratives for the college application essay and review for the fall SAT. 
  • English 12: Literature and Film

    This course explores the complex interplay between film and literature. Selected novels, short stories, and plays are analyzed alongside films with similar themes. Additionally, this course introduces students to the basics of film analysis, cinematic formal elements, genre, and narrative structure and helps students develop the skills to recognize, analyze, describe and enjoy film as an art and entertainment form. To understand how films are constructed to make meaning and engage audiences, students will be introduced to the basic “building blocks” and formal elements (narrative, mise-en-scene, cinematography, sound, and editing) that make up the film as well as some fundamental principles of analysis, genre, style, performance, and storytelling. The class includes weekly reading, screening, and short writing assignments. Students will also examine the visual interpretation of literary techniques and the limitations or special capacities of film versus text to present a literary work (this does NOT mean that the films are chosen in relation to film versions of the same works). In the third quarter, students will examine how films and literature from similar time-periods portray the human condition and the roles of men and women in various cultures, while the fourth quarter will examine the relationship between man and technology as portrayed in famous films and literature Post-1980. 
  • SJU First Year Writing

    This is an intensive core writing and reading course, which involves an investigation into various means of composing texts and the uses of rhetoric. The course helps students improve their writing, but it also serves to give students an opportunity to experiment with their own developing styles, to explore a range of compositional strategies, to research ideas and topics of relevance to their own lives, and to engage in class discussions and organized debates. The course, therefore, seeks to show that writing is a process of thinking, a powerful medium necessary for the student’s intellectual and professional growth. As part of their graduation requirement, all students are required to complete a course-appropriate research paper in accordance with MLA style and format standards. In preparation for college, students also learn how to write an application essay and prepare for the fall SAT. 

    Prerequisites: 
    • Approval of the English Department 
    • An overall 90% in junior English

    • An overall average of 80%

    • At least an 85% on the NYS English Regents 
    • A minimum combined Math and Verbal SAT or PSAT score of 1060 by the time of course selection
    • An evaluation of the student’s writing portfolio from junior English 
    • Open to qualified students in the Academy and Honors Programs 
    • This course is open to seniors only for St. John’s credit 
    *Students who successfully pass this course will be eligible to receive 3 college credits through St. John’s University. Students will be responsible for all additional fees charged by St. John’s as well as completing any required applications for acceptance to the College Advantage Program. 
  • AP English Literature and Composition

    In preparation for the May exam, this course engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes as well as smaller-scale elements such as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Each student maintains a writing portfolio of written and revised pieces. Students will complete a literature research paper in accordance with MLA style and format standards. 

    **Admission to this course is based on 1) approval of the English Department, 2) an overall 90% average in junior English, 3) an SAT critical reading score of 600 or higher, 4) at least an 85% on the NYS English Regents exam, 5) the student’s conduct appropriate for an intensive reading and writing course, and 6) an evaluation of the student’s formal writings from junior year.** 
  • The Literacy of Video Games

    Video games offer rich and immersive narrative experiences and do so in ways unique to the medium. They contain many of the structures and devices common to literature, while also presenting new avenues of analysis through gameplay mechanics. This course seeks to harness the popularity of video games as a means of engaging students while simultaneously teaching critical thinking/reading skills and writing skills across various genres. Students will be expected to complete
    many of the kinds of assessments traditionally assigned in any English class: journal reflections, short analysis pieces, longer essays, presentations, etc. These assessments will focus not only on the instruction of writing across various genres (narrative, expository, analytical, argumentative), but will also address the elements and devices that are specific to video games. Students will also work on projects related to, but not limited to, designing their own video game: writing the story arc, developing game mechanics, drafting levels and conflicts, adding music, etc.
  • Visual Storytelling and Video Production

    How do you communicate with images instead of words? In this hands-on video production course, students gain the skill sets to become visual storytellers. We’ll study the visual authors and work to develop your original voice. The curriculum will introduce the basics of screenwriting, photography, camera functions, video editing, media analysis, and filmmaking. Students will work individually and in groups to write, shoot, and edit their own projects. Prospective projects may include commercials, public service announcements, short films, music videos, documentaries, and news stories. Students will collaborate to populate our own YouTube Channel: Xaverian Storytellers. (Note: Students should anticipate being both in front of and behind the camera)
  • Introduction to Acting

    This course will broaden our literary understanding of character and drama as we examine texts like performers approaching their next job. Students will breakdown characters through table readings, monologues, and two-actor scenes. Works read may include AntigoneMuch Ado About NothingThe Glass MenagerieThe Servant of Two MastersCompanyDog Sees God, and more. Students will research the creation and development of different acting-styles: Commedia dell’Arte, the Greek Chorus, Meisner Technique, musical theater, and others. Assignments include creating a character history, writing a lost or missing scene, analyzing setting, props, and costumes (and how they inform a performer’s choices), and other acting, directing, and playwriting activities. Note: All students will be expected to perform in front of their peers. 
  • Introduction to Creative Reading and Writing

    This course is designed to introduce students to the basic elements of fiction writing and to help them hone their writing abilities beyond the traditional five-paragraph essay. After reading and studying published short stories, graphic novels, plays, poetry, and other genres of creative writing, students will apply different techniques to their own writing. They will navigate the writing process by brainstorming story ideas, workshopping drafts in class, and maintaining a portfolio of published work for genres of writing including flash fiction, personal narratives, poetry, plays, and short movie scripts. Writers in the class will be expected to submit final pieces to The Voyager, Xaverian’s art and literary magazine. 
    • This is an approved elective course for sophomores, juniors, or seniors in the honors or academy programs. 
    • Admission to this course is based on 1) English Department evaluation of the student’s formal writing in the previous year’s English class, and 2) a personal creative writing sample (upon request)

English Department Specialized Studies Courses

List of 7 items.

  • Literacy Skills I

    Literacy Skills I is a course designed for high school students who need reading instruction through a multisensory structured language education approach or need support in reading and writing for optimum success as students in our Specialized Studies Program. It is designed to review foundational skills, continue instruction, and enhance previously learned skills and concepts. Units are designed according to basic reading concepts including reading comprehension, reading fluency, decoding, spelling, vocabulary, critical thinking, composition, and research skills. Units are also designed with reference to the different types of texts to which students are exposed in the general education setting including narrative, persuasive, informational, and current events texts. Assessments target each student's individual achievement in reading with emphasis on the expectation that students will read effectively, write with complexity, and think critically for a variety of purposes. Standardized, pre and post-testing are completed throughout the year to chart student progress. Students will enhance critical skills needed to read for a purpose, respond to literature, and write for multiple disciplines.
  • English 9

    The focus of Freshman English in the Specialized Studies program is on reading for critical analysis and writing for effective communication. Given the basic tools for active reading, students investigate the effects of literary techniques and rhetorical strategies in an array of works, including short stories, poems, and long works of fiction, including William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin in the Sun, and John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men. Furthermore, various complex informational texts serve as the basis for analyzing a writer's purpose and tone. Each student maintains a "Writing Portfolio" of his or her formal writings. Writing is reinforced through daily journals on the literature and personal experience. Grammar is addressed through the students' practice of writing essays that describe, analyze, inform, argue, persuade, and compare/contrast. Likewise, all freshmen conduct the step-by-step process for completing a research paper in accordance with MLA style and format standards. With an emphasis on reading for context clues, students are introduced to new vocabulary words that are used in monthly articles in The New York Times’ Upfront Magazine. In addition, vocabulary is also taken from the literary works read in this course. In preparation for the ELA Common Core Regents exam in the junior year, students read closely and critically, producing text-based responses and analyses from a variety of sources.
  • Literacy Skills II

    Literacy Skills II continues with the curriculum topics that were covered in the Literacy Skills I course. While reinforcing skills already learned, students will enter into the realm of public speaking by presenting speeches that convince, inform, entertain, and persuade. Students will learn to analyze and evaluate a variety of authors, ultimately writing to formulate their own points of view which they can debate in a formal manner. In addition, they will utilize technology resources to create visual and audio presentations to prove ideas using a variety of techniques learned and mastered. Special attention will also be given to developing a clear and precise method of writing, revising, and editing multiple-paragraph essays. This will help prepare students for the Global Studies, English, and U.S. History and Government Regents exams. Additionally, there will be a heavy emphasis on vocabulary as students get ready for the SAT and ACT testing.
  • English 10

    With the focus remaining on critical reading and writing, students further explore the world of literary characters who face difficult personal, moral, spiritual, psychological, and religious choices, often perceived as “outsiders” as a result of their heroic feats or tragic flaws. Through works such as the epic poem Beowulf, William Shakespeare’s Macbeth, Reginald Rose’s Twelve Angry Men, Marc Haddon’s The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, along with other supplementary nonfiction works, students read and analyze several pieces of literature and engage in writing for literary analysis and interpretation. In addition to text-appropriate vocabulary, students read for context clues and for the nuances of a writer's diction in both fiction and nonfiction. Students read monthly articles from The New York Times’ Upfront Magazine, learning new vocabulary in context while also staying up to date on issues in the world around them. In preparation for the ELA Common Core Regents exam in the junior year, students read closely and critically and produce text-based arguments and analyses in addition to writing from a variety of perspectives. Each student maintains an online writing portfolio of his or her written and revised pieces and fulfills several individual or group presentation components.
  • English 11

    This course teaches students to examine literary themes of morality and conscience, rebellion and revolt, perception and reality, and the individual in search of self-identity. All students read August Wilson's Fences, as well as other works such as Harper Lee’s Go Tell A Watchman, Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire, and Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman, thereby reinforcing the skills of literary analysis and argumentation. In preparation for the January NYS ELA Common Core Regents, students thoroughly review the components of the exam, focusing on active reading strategies and carefully outlined writing skills for effective analysis and synthesis writing. In the latter part of the year, SAT critical reading and writing become the focus. Likewise, grammar and usage are taught based on topics suggested by the SAT. Each student maintains a "Writing Portfolio" of written and revised pieces.
  • English 12

    The senior course is designed to refine previously developed skills and to expose the students to some of the challenges likely to be encountered in college. The first half of the year emphasizes preparation for the December SAT, writing the college application essay, and close study of the summer reading text. The second half of the year focuses on the steps and procedures in writing an MLA research paper, which each student will complete. Readings, discussions, writings, and reflections on world literature texts allow students to explore new ideas and approaches while honing their critical analysis and writing abilities. All students read William Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing and Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee’s Inherit the Wind. Each student maintains a writing portfolio of written and revised pieces.
  • Creative Writing

    This course encourages students to cultivate the necessary qualities of a professional writer in the literary world. Students will focus their attention on the craft behind writing imaginative literature. Students will have the opportunity to explore several different styles of writing including, but not limited to poetry and prose, as well as reflect and respond to literature, art mediums, quotes, media, movies, and music. Students will indulge in writing blogs, poetry, short stories, plays, book reviews, movie reviews, comedy, children’s books, advertisements, biographies, autobiographies, and other types of writing that express creativity. Students will also read and analyze writing samples from professional writers as well as student writers to guide student progress. Originality and writing that shows thought will be emphasized. Strategies to avoid writer’s block and new ways to uncover ideas for writing will be studied. Peer reviews and sharing ideas are essential elements of this course. Students will be expected to carry their final pieces through the publication process, contributing to the production of Xaverian's art and literary magazine, The Voyager.

English Department Members

List of 17 members.

  • Photo of Steven Giugliano

    Steven Giugliano 07

    English Department Chairperson
    (718) 836-7100 x874
  • Photo of Denise Cotogno

    Denise Cotogno 

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x869
  • Photo of Brendan Gorman

    Brendan Gorman 04

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x806
  • Photo of Michelle Harrington

    Michelle Harrington 

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x102
  • Photo of Martin Hewitt

    Martin Hewitt 

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x879
  • Photo of Margaret Iuni

    Margaret Iuni 

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x868
  • Photo of Patricia Louisa

    Patricia Louisa 

    Executive Assistant to the President
    (718) 836-7100 x184
  • Photo of Francis Morrisey

    Francis Morrisey 87

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x818
  • Photo of Kathleen Morris

    Kathleen Morris 

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x188
  • Photo of Chelsea Ann Medina

    Chelsea Ann Medina 

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x856
  • Photo of Dana Napoli

    Dana Napoli 

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x158
  • Photo of Vincent Raimondo

    Vincent Raimondo 97

    Assistant Principal for Staff Development
    (718) 836-7100 x193
  • Photo of Ashley Romero

    Ashley Romero 

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x853
  • Photo of Jason Santel

    Jason Santel 

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x884
  • Photo of Mary Scally

    Mary Scally 

    Teacher
    718-836-7100 x827
  • Photo of James Schmidt

    James Schmidt 90

    Teacher
    (718) 836-7100 x833
  • Photo of Thomas Snyder

    Thomas Snyder 06

    Academic Dean
    (718) 836-7100 x120
Established in 1957, Xaverian is one of thirteen schools nationwide sponsored by the Xaverian Brothers.
Xaverian
7100 Shore Road         Brooklyn, New York 11209         Phone: (718) 836-7100